COLD, VIBRATION, AIRBORNE EXPOSURES AND SOCIO-ECONOMIC INFLUENCES IN MINING

Health and Safety

 

WHO has classified complain of exposure to mechanical vibration as an occupational disease. This classification is intended to improve labour safety and health surveillance as well as compensation. In 1977 the International Labour Office (ILO) listed vibration as an occupational hazard and recommended that measures have to be taken to protect employees from vibration and that the responsible authorities have to establish criteria to determine the danger.

Kuva 9 - About vibration - Health and safety
Drilling underground

 

The European Union has approved a directive that covers minimum health and safety requirements regarding the exposure of workers to the risks rising from vibration. The employers shall, as an obligation, assess and, if necessary, measure the levels of mechanical vibration to which the workers are exposed.

In the directive, two exposure values are stated, daily action value and limit value (Table). If the action value is exceeded, the employer should establish and implement a programme of technical and/or organisational measures intended to reduce to a minimum exposure to vibration and the attendant risks. Moreover, workers exposed to vibration in excess of the action value shall be entitled to appropriate health surveillance. In any event, workers shall not be exposed above the exposure limit value. If the exposure limit value is exceeded, the employer should take immediate action to reduce exposure below this value.

 

 

 

Daily action value (m/s2)

 

 

Daily limit value (m/s2)

Hand-arm vibration

 

2.5

5.0

Whole body vibration

0.5

1.15

 

 

 

Learn more

Human responses to vibration

Risk Prevention

Health and Safety

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